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Cnidarians Developmental Biology and Molecular Ecology

Head of the Lab: Dr. Tamar Lotan

We are interested in the following topics:

  • Cnidarian reproduction, proliferation and early developmental pathways.

  • The effect of the changing marine environment on cnidarian development and survival.

  • Assembly, function and evolution of cnidarian stinging capsules.

Lab Leader: Dr. Tamar Lotan

Now recruiting MSc Students 

 

Cnidaria is one of the most ancient multicellular phyla, having evolved 700 million ago. The phylum, which includes organisms such as jellyfish, sea anemones, corals and hydra, is considered a sister group to the Bilateria. Cnidarians are commonly characterized by a single body axis, only two germ layers, namely ectoderm and endoderm, and unique highly complex stinging capsules. In addition to their morphological simplicity, cnidarians have a high level of developmental plasticity that equips them for shape transformation, regeneration and asexual proliferation during their life cycle. Cnidarians are also key players in the marine ecosystem, acting as reef structure builders and as both predators and prey.

These unique characteristics, together with their basal position in the evolutionary tree, make the cnidarians an important group for studies of basic developmental and evolutionary processes, as well as of environmental adaptations. We are interested in understanding cnidarian developmental biology and molecular ecology as detailed below.

Development Programming

Cnidarians have a well-defined embryogenesis program, but are also capable of propagating using asexual reproduction via fission, budding or strobilation. The ability of cnidarians to undergo multiple developmental programs can have profound ecological and evolutionary consequences.   Our goal is to understand the critical decision junctions that give rise to development programming during cnidarians life cycle via sexual or asexual mode of reproduction.To explore these stages we are using the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis and the jellyfish Aurelia aurita.

Oogenesis: We are interested in understanding the oogenesis processes from the very early determination of the primordial germ cells (PGCs) through oocyte maturation to early stages of embryogenesis. Identifying the molecular pathways that govern the differentiation of PGCs into germline stem cells is a key to deciphering the genetic program that carries the potential to form new life. However, little is known about the mechanisms that execute this program in Cnidaria. We take advantage of the emerging genetic model of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis, as its full genomic sequence has been published, molecular tools are available and its reproduction can be controlled and induced in the lab.

In order to get an initial insight into the oogenesis process, we have analyzed five different stages from early oogenesis to first embryonic divisions using a proteomic approach. We compared the proteomic profiles of mature ovulated oocyte of Nematostella to MII oocyte stage of mouse, two organisms that diverged 500 million years ago. Our findings suggest that oocyte proteome template predates the divergence of the cnidarian and bilaterian lineages. This was the first proteomic oocyte study done in Cnidaria. Currently, we are testing selected pathways by analyzing proteins expression and function. To detect PGC differentiation, we are creating transgenic animals using promoters of known stem cells, such as vasa and nanos, linked to fluorescent markers.

 

 

Jellyfish strobilation:  In the class Scyphozoa, where the medusa phase is the dominant part of the life cycle, the polyp’s asexual proliferation results in the production of dozens of juvenile medusas (ephyra) in a repeated segmented process called strobilation. This rapid proliferation leads to jellyfish outbreaks around the globe, which in the last decade seem to have become more severe and frequent. To study the strobilation process, we use the moon jellyfish Aurelia aurita as a model system.  We have generated a wide data set using next-generation sequencing of six developmental stages in order to study strobila and ephyra development. Elucidating the mechanistic processes that give rise to medusa development is essential to our understanding of both jellyfish evolution and proliferation.
   

Cnidarian stinging capsules 

The Cnidarians' stinging cells manufacture intracellular structures known as cnidocysts, cyst capsules, loaded with an array of toxins. Upon activation of the capsule, a high internal pressure of 150 bars develops, resulting in the discharge of a folded tubule at an acceleration of 5 x106 g immediately releasing the toxin arsenal into the target cell. About 30 subtypes of capsules are known, all functioning on the same principles, but differing in size, shape and length of the tubule. How is the rigid capsule assembled within the stinging cell? What are the biological active compounds which are delivered into the prey? Can we gain insight into the constraints that shape the capsule?  

To answer these questions, we have adopted a multidisciplinary approach that combines biology, fish parasitology, micro- and nano-fluidics and drug delivery. We study a group of parasites known as Myxozoa, which was recently placed within the Cnidaria phylum, in order to decipher stinging cell evolution, development and function. This basic research has important application as these parasites have devastating effects on aquaculture and natural fish populations. To test the physical characteristics and the internal osmotic pressures of the stinging capsules, we utilize fabricated chips with high-speed camera. To uncover the contents of the stinging capsules, we apply proteomics combined with transcriptomics. Combining molecular data with the physical approach accelerates our understanding of the evolution and function of the stinging capsules.  

 

The Impact of Marine Pollution

Heavy metal contamination poses a global threat to the marine environment, as heavy metals are passed up the food chain and persist in the environment long after the pollution source is contained. We employed a transcriptome-wide RNA-Seq approach to analyze Nematostella molecular defense mechanisms against four heavy metals. We identified, co-upregulation of immediate-early transcription factors such as Egr1 and AP1. These immediate-early transcription factors may play a role in the first line of protection against the polluted environment. In addition, we revealed a new pathway of defense that regulates the synthesis of the metal-binding phytochelatins, instead of the metallothioneins that are absent from the Cnidaria genome. Currently, we are using phosphorylation assays to understand the role of MAPKs in the processes. Our ultimate goal is to understand how the polluted environment is perceived within the cells to increase anemone adaptation. 

blooms of jellyfish     

Current Position

2009-Present  

Senior lecturer at the Marine Biology Department of The Leon H. Charney School of Marine Sciences at Haifa University.

Professional Experience

2015- Present Director at The Interuniversity Institute for Marine Sciences in Eilat (http://www.iui-eilat.ac.il)
2011-2015 Member of the board of the Israeli Association of Aquatic Sciences (IAAS) (http://www.israelaquatic.org.il/).

2008-Present

Director at the Kinneret College on the Sea of Galilee (http://www.kinneret.ac.il/).

2000-2008

Founder, President and Director at NanoCyte Inc. NanoCyte, today Starlet Derma (http://www.starletderma.com/) is a biotechnology company leveraging marine extracted nano-injectors for immediate active delivery of pharmaceuticals and cosmetically active compounds. The NanoCyte system is extracted from marine stinging cells in a form of dried micro-capsules containing each a folded nano-injector. Once the system is activated a high pressure of 150 atmospheres is developed within the capsule, resulting in an unfolding of the long thin nano-injector out of the capsule at an extremely high speed. The nano-injector penetrates the skin at an acceleration of 5.41x106g. Today the company is in Phase II clinical trials (USA).

1998-2000 

Founder and Head of R&D at Nidaria Technology Ltd, a biotechnology company developing marine stinger inhibitor (http://nidaria.com/). Today the company manufactures and exports patented dual protection products to over 20 countries around the globe

Academic Education

1995-1998

Post doctoral research in Embryogenesis. Department of Plant Biology, University of California, Davis, USA.

Characterization of the Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON1 (LEC1) mutant. We found that LEC1 is a key regulator transcription factor during embryogenesis and is sufficient to induce embryonic development in vegetative cells.

1992-1995 

Post doctoral research in Molecular Biology. Department of Genetics, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

Characterization of the carotenoid astaxanthin biosynthesis pathway in the fresh water green alga Haematococcus pluvialis. We used a novel strategy for the gene cloning and succeeded to isolate the gene and functionally expressed it to create red bacteria colonies

1987-1992

Ph.D. studies in Genetics & Biochemistry. Department of Plant Genetics, Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel.

The regulatory pathways of pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins in plants

1985-1986

Research project in Biochemistry. Department of Chemical Biology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

1983-1985

M.Sc. studies in Embryogenesis. Department of Zoology, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

1980-1983

B.Sc. studies in Biology. The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel.

Publications and Patents

Refereed Journals:

  • Agron, M., Brekhman, V., Morgenstern, D., Lotan, T.  Regulation of AP-1 by MAPK signaling in metal-stressed sea anemone. Cell Physiol Biochem 42(3):952-964, 2017 https://doi.org/10.1159/000478678

MAPK signaling

  • Park, S., Capelin, D., Piriatinskiy, G., Lotan, T., Yossifon, G.  Dielectrophoretic characterization and isolation of jellyfish stinging capsules. Electrophoresis, 2017; https://doi.org/10.1002/elps.201700072  
  • Park, S., Piriatinskiy, G., Zeevi, D., Ben-David, J., Yossifon, G., Shavit, U. and Lotan, T. The nematocyst’s sting is driven by the tubule moving front. Journal of the Royal Society Interface, 14: 20160917, 2017 DOI: 10.1098/rsif.2016.0917 (For the movie please see this link).   Read More...

  • Ben-David, J., Atkinson,SD.,  Pollak,Y.,  Yossifon, G., Shavit, U., Bartholomew, JL. and Lotan, T.  Myxozoan polar tubules display structural and functional variation. Parasit Vectors, 9:549, 2016. doi:  10.1186/k016-1819-4 (open access).

  • Levitan S., Sher N., Brekhman V., Ziv T., Lubzens E. and Lotan T. The making of an embryo in a basal metazoan: proteomic analysis in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis. Proteomics  2015.  Read More...

  • Brekhman, V., Malik, A., Haas, B., Sher, N. and Lotan, T. Transcriptome profiling of the dynamic life cycle of the scypohozoan jellyfish Aurelia aurita. BMC Genomics 16:74, 2015. Read More...

  • Rachamim, T., Morgenstern, D., Aharonovich, D., Brekhman, V., Lotan, T. and Sher, D. The dynamically-evolving nematocyst content of an Anthozoan, a Scyphozoan and a Hydrozoan.  Molecular Biology and Evolution 32 (3) 740-753, 2015.  Read More...MOLECULAR ECOLOGY

  • Elran R., Raam M., Kraus R., Brekhman V., Sher N., Plaschkes, I., Califa-Capsi V., Lotan T. Early and late response of Nematostella vectensis transcriptome to heavy metals. Molecular Ecology, 23:19 4722-4736, 2014 Read More...
  • Hensel, K, Lotan, T, Sanders, S.M, Cartwright, P. and Frank U. Lineage-specific evolution of cnidarian Wnt ligand. Evolution & Development, 16:5, 259–269, 2014. Read More...
  • Tal. Y, Sharaev, A, Kazir Z, Brekhman, V Lotan, T Continuous Drug Release by Sea Anemone Nematostella vectensis Stinging Microcapsules. Marine Drugs 12(2): 734-745, 2014. Read More...
  • Lotan T, Chalifa-Caspi V, Ziv T, Brekhman V, Gordon MM, Admon A, Lubzens E. Evolutionary conservation of the mature oocyte proteome. EuPA Open Proteomics 3: 27-36, 2014. Read More...
  • Shaoul, E., Ayalon, A., Tal. Y., & Lotan, T. Transdermal Delivery of Scopolamine by Natural Submicron Injectors: In-Vivo Study in Pig. PloS ONE 7(2) e31922, 2012 https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0031922  Read more...
  • Yoffe, C., Lotan, T., Benayhu, Y. A modified view on Octocorals: Heteroxenia ‎fuscescenes nematocysts are diverse featuring ancestral and novel type. PLoS ONE 7(2):e31902, 2012. Read more...
  • Ayalon A., Schichor I., Tal Y. and Lotan, T. Immediate topical drug delivery by natural submicron injectors. Int J Pharm 419:147-153, 2011. Read more...
  • Lotan, T. Ohto, M-A., Matsudaria Yee, K., West, M.A.L., Lo, R. Kwong, R.W. Yamagishi, K., Fischer, R.L., Goldberg, R.B. and Harada, J.J. Arabidopsis LEAFY COTYLEDON1 is sufficient to induce embryp development in vegetative cells. Cell 93:1195-1205, 1998.  Read More...
  • Harada, J.J., Lotan, T., Fischer, R.L. and Goldberg, R.B. Embryos without sex. Trends Plant Sci. 3:452-453, 1998.
  • Hirschberg, J.,Cohen, M., Harker, M., Lotan,T., Mann, V. and Pecker, I. Molecular genetics of the carotenoid biosynthesis pathway in plants and algae. Pure & Appl. Chem., 69:2151-2158, 1997.
  • Lotan, T. and Hirschberg, J. Cloning an expression in Escherichia coli of the gene encoding b-C-4-oxygenase, that converts ?-carotene to the ketocarotenoid cantahxanthin in Haematococcus pluvialis. FEBS 364:125-128, 1995.
  • Eyal-Giladi, H., Lotan, T., Levin,T., Avner, O. and Hochman, J. Avian marginal zone cells function as primitive streak inducers only after their migration into the hypoblast. Development 120:2501-2509, 1994.
  • Ori, N., Sessa, G., Lotan, T., Himmelhoch, S. and Fluhr, R. A major stylar matrix polypeptide (sp41) is a member of the pathogenesis-related proteins superclass. EMBO J. 9: 3429-3436, 1991.
  • Fluhr, R., G. Sessa, A. Sharon, N. Ori and T. Lotan. Pathogenesis-related proteins exhibit both pathogen-induced and developmental regulation. In: Proceedings of the 5th International Symp. on: Molecular Genetics of Plant-Microbe Interaction. Hennecke, H., ed. Kluwer Acad. Publishers, Dordrecht, The Netherlands. 1:387-394, 1990.
  • Lotan, T. and Fluhr, R. Function and regulation accumulation of plant pathogenesis-related proteins. Symbiosis 8:33-46, 1990.
  • Lotan, T. and Fluhr, R. Xylanase, a Novel elicitor of pathogenesis-related proteins in tobacco, uses a non-ethylene pathways for induction. Plant Physiol. 93:811-817, 1990.
  • Lotan, T., Ori, N. and Fluhr, R. Pathogenesis-related proteins are developmentally regulated in tobacco flowers. Plant Cell 1:881-887, 1989.

Book Chapters:

  • Lotan, T., Tal. Y., Ayalon, A. Fast acting topical hydrophilic drug delivery via a natural nano-injection system. In: Percutaneous Penetration Enhancers Physical Methods in Penetration Enhancement, Dragicevic-Curic, N. & Maibach, H. I. (eds.) (Springer Berlin Heidelberg). Chap: 21 343-350, 2017.
  • Lotan T. Leveraging nematocysts toward human care. The Cnidaria, past, present and future, The world of Medusa and her sisters. 1st edition. Goffredo, G. and Dubinsky, Z. (eds). (Springer International Publishing). Chap: 42 683-690, 2016
  • Lotan, T, Jellyfish a winning structure. In: The Glory of the Sea: Stability and Change in the Aquatic Systems of Israel, 1st edition, Stambler,N., Lotan, T., Goodman, B., Berman-Frank, I. (Eds.), Chap 14:158-166, 2013.
  • Lotan, T. Immediate topical drug delivery using natural nano-injectors. In: Modified Release Drug Delivery Technology, 2nd edition, Hadgraft J., Rathbone M. and Lane M. (Eds.),  2008.
  • Lotan, T. Natural nano-injectors as a vehicle for novel topical drug delivery. In: Precutaneous absorption, 4th edition, Bronaugh, R. L. & Maibach, H. I. (Eds.), 2005.

Edited Books:

  • The Glory of the Sea: Stability and Change in the Aquatic Systems of Israel, 1st edition, Stambler,N., Lotan, T., Goodman, B., Berman-Frank, I. (eds) , 2013.

Patents Granted:

  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering a therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. US Patent 8,486,441, 2013.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering a therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. US patent 8,297,912, 2012.
  • Lotan, T., Eckhouse, S., Shaoul, E. Stinging cells expressing an exogenous polynucleotide encoding a therapeutic, diagnostics or a cosmetic agent and methods compositions and devices utilizing such stinging cells or capsules derive there from for delivering the therapeutic, diagnostic or cosmetic agent into a tissue. US patent 8,337,868, 2012.
  • Lotan, T., and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering a therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. EP patent 1379127.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Use of stinging cells/capsules for the delivery of active agents to keratinous substances. US patent 7,998,509, 2011.
  • Lotan, T., Eckhouse S., Shaoul, E. Stinging cells expressing an exogenous polynucleotide encoding a therapeutic, diagnostics or a cosmetic agent and methods compositions and devices utilizing such stinging cells or capsules derive there from for delivering the therapeutic, diagnostic or cosmetic agent into a tissue. Israel patent 2003164191, 2011.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering a therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. US patent 8,062,660, 2011.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Compositions of matter and pharmaceutical compositions comprising stinging capsules and cosmetic agents. Israel patent 2001155097, 2011.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Use of stinging cells/capsules for the delivery of active agents to keratinous substances. US patent 7,998,509, 2011.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Use of stinging cells/capsules for the delivery of active agents to keratinous substances. US patent 7,632,522, 2009.
  • Lotan, T., Eckhouse, S., Shaoul, E. Stinging cells expressing an exogenous polynucleotide encoding a therapeutic, diagnostics or a cosmetic agent and methods compositions and devices utilizing such stinging cells or capsules derive there from for delivering the therapeutic, diagnostic or cosmetic agent into a tissue. US patent 7,611,723, 2009.
  • Lotan, T., Eckhouse S., Shaoul, E. Stinging cells expressing an exogenous polynucleotide encoding a therapeutic, diagnostics or a cosmetic agent and methods compositions and devices utilizing such stinging cells or capsules derive there from for delivering the therapeutic, diagnostic or cosmetic agent into a tissue. EP patent 1519755 2008.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering a therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. US patent 7,338,665, 2008.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. US patent 6,923,976, 2005.
  • Hirschberg, J. and Lotan, T. Polynucleotide molecule from Haematococcus pluvialis encoding a polypeptide having a beta-C-4-oxygenase activity for biotechnological production of (3S, 3'S) astaxanthin and its specific expression in chromoplasts of higher plants. US patent 6,903,245, 2005.
  • Harada, JJ, Lotan, T., Ohto, M-a., Goldberg, RB, Fischer, RL. Leafy cotyledon1 genes and their uses. US patent 6,781,035, 2004.
  • Harada, JJ., Lotan, T., Ohto, M-a., Goldberg, RB, Fischer, RL. Leafy cotyledon1 genes and their uses. US patent 6,545,201, 2003.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods utilizing stinging cells/capsules. US patent 6,613,344, 2003.
  • Harada, JJ., Lotan T., Ohto, M-a., Goldberg, RB., Fischer, RL. Leafy cotyledon genes and their uses. US patent 6,320,102, 2001.
  • Harada, JJ., Lotan T., Ohto, M-a., Goldberg, RB., Fischer, RL. Leafy cotyledon1 genes and methods of modulating embryo development in transgenic plants. US patent 6,235,975, 2001.
  • Hirschberg, J. and Lotan, T. Polynucleotide molecule from Haematococcus pluvialis encoding a polypeptide having a beta-C-4-oxygenase activity for biotechnological production of (3S, 3'S) astaxanthin and its specific expression in chromoplasts of higher plants. US patent 6,218,599, 2001.
  • Hirschberg, J. and Lotan, T. Polynucleotide molecule from Haematococcus pluvialis encoding a polypeptide having a beta-C-4-oxygenase activity for biotechnological production of (3S, 3'S) astaxanthin and its specific expression in chromoplasts of higher plants. US patent 5,965,795, 1999.
  • Hirschberg, J. and Lotan, T. Polynucleotide molecule from Haematococcus pluvialis encoding a polypeptide having a beta-C-4-oxygenase activity for biotechnological production of (3S,3S) astaxanthin. US patent 5,916,791, 1999.

Patents Pending:

  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering a therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. Israel patent application 2001199236.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods, compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for conditioning a tissue prior to delivery of an active agent. US patent application 11/108,662.
  • Lotan, T. and Eckhouse, S. Methods compositions and devices utilizing stinging cells/capsules for delivering a therapeutic or a cosmetic agent into a tissue. EP patent application 2006 06728266.5
  • Eckhouse, S., Lotan T., Ayalon, A. Pharmaceutical compositions and delivery devices comprising stinging cells or capsules. US patent application 13/882,192, 2013.
Dr. Tamar Lotan
Developmental Marine Biology and Molecular Ecology
+972-4-8240034
 
Dr. Vera Brekhman
Developmental processes in Sea anemone, Jellyfish and Myxozoa
+972-4-8288795
 
Shani Levy
Nematostella from planula to polyp
 
M.D, Ph.D Eyal Margalit  Rhopilema nomadica jellyfish microbiome  emargalit5@gmail.com  
Neta Sa'ar
Nematostella primordial germ cells differentiation netasaar@gmail.com  
Shelly Reuven
Nematostella oogenesis shelly.reuven@gmail.com  
       

Graduate students

   
Roey Kraus 2013
The defense molecular mechanism of the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis in polluted environment
Ron Elran 2014
Effect of four heavy metals, with emphasis on copper, on the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.  relranster@gmail.com
Maayan Raam 2015

AP-1 pathway characterization in response to metal stress in the sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.  maayan.raam@gmail.com

Shimrit Levitan  2015

Molecular mechanisms underlying oogenesis in the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis.   shimritavra@gmail.com

Gadi Piriatinsky 2016
Nematocyst tubule elongation mechanism and profiling of myxozoan polar capsule proteome 4gadip@gmail.com

 

Nir Kozokaro 2016

(ORT Braude College of Engineering project)

 

Characterization of the insulin pathway during oocyte development in the sea anemone Nematostella Vectensis

Mona Diab 2016 2016

(ORT Braude College of Engineering project)

Characterization of Nanos2 and PL-10 expression in the starlet sea anemone Nematostella vectensis
Dr. Alena Kodádková 2016
(post Doc)
Aurelia sensory structure synthesis and function alena.kodadkova@gmail.com

 

 

The Nano Injection System of Cnidaria - Intensive Course

INSTRUCTORS: Tamar Lotan Ph.D and Amit Lotan Ph.D

Once a year we offer an intensive course in the unique marine facility of IUI (http://www.iui-eilat.ac.il)

COURSE SUMMARY

The Cnidaria, (jellyfish, coral, sea anemone, hydra), a phylum that dates 700 million years, has optimized through evolution a sophisticated nano-injection system that harnesses physical, chemical and cellular forces to generate injections at an acceleration of 5,000,000g, constituting one of the fastest events in cell biology.

The course starts with an introduction to the Cnidaria phylum. It then dives deeply into the molecular mechanism of the Cnidaria stinging system and its toxin delivery machinery. Theory turns into practice within the experimental laboratory, using diverse tools for purifying and manipulating the nano-injector system, including specific biochemical testing of its toxin's activity. The course concludes with a glance into the biotech industry.

This course is designed for students and academic staff members who are interested in exploring one of the oldest and most powerful nano-injection systems in the marine environment. 

  
2009/10 Course
  
2010/11 Course
  
2012 Course
2014 Course
2014 Course

2016 Course

 

jelly_w_fish2

We have open positions for PhD students and a postdoc.

BSc Students who are interested in master research program are always welcome.

Please send your CV to Dr. Tamar Lotan or contact the lab.

 

Contact Us

Dr. Tamar Lotan

Department of Marine Biology

Multipurpose Building: Offfice and Lab 265;

Leon Charney School of Marine Sciences

University of Haifa, Mt. Carmel, Haifa 3498838, Israel

Office: 04-8240032

Lab: 04-8288795

Mobile: 052-8723535

School Fax: 04-8288267

Email: lotant@univ.haifa.ac.il

 

9th ISFP meeting in Valencia

9th ISFP meeting in Valencia

 

MCE Lab in work and in recreation

MCE Lab in work and in recreation

MCE Lab in work and in recreation

MCE Lab in work and in recreation

MCE Lab in work and in recreation

MCE Lab in work and in recreation

MCE Lab in work and in recreation